Hakan Utangaç

Hakan Utangaç (born 1965 in Istanbul) is the guitarist of heavy metal band Mezarkabul (known as Pentagram in Turkey). He is a founding member of the band.[1]
References[edit]

^ Karaege, Vefik. “Biography: Pentagram”. AMG. Retrieved 10 May 2010. 

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Mezarkabul

Gökalp Ergen
Hakan Utangaç
Metin Türkcan
Tarkan Gözübüyük
Cenk Ünnü

Ümit Yılbar
Murat Net
Bartu Toptas
Ogün Sanlısoy
Demir Demirkan
Onur “Mr. Cat” Pamukçu
Murat İlkan

Studio albums

Pentagram
Trail Blazer
Anatolia
Unspoken
Bir
MMXII

Live albums

Popçular Dışarı
1987

Demos

Live at the Trail

DVDs

1987

This article on a guitarist is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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This article about a Turkish musician is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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일본야동

2004 Nippon Professional Baseball season

This article is about the 2004 Nippon Professional Baseball season only. For information on all of baseball, see 2004 in baseball.

2004 NPB season

League
Nippon Professional Baseball

Sport
Baseball

Duration
March 27, 2004 – October 25, 2004

Regular Season

Season MVP
CL: Kenshin Kawakami (CHU)
PL: Nobuhiko Matsunaka (DAI)

League Postseason

CL champions
Chunichi Dragons

  CL runners-up
Yakult Swallows

PL champions
Seibu Lions

  PL runners-up
Fukuoka Daiei Hawks

Japan Series

Champions
Seibu Lions

  Runners-up
Chunichi Dragons

Finals MVP
Takashi Ishii (SEI)

NPB seasons

← 2003
2005 →

The 2004 Nippon Professional Baseball season ended with the Seibu Lions defeating the Chunichi Dragons in the 2004 Japan Series. This season also saw the first and only players strike in Japanese professional baseball history. Players went on strike for 2 days in September because of the potential mergers and realignment.

Contents

1 Format

1.1 Central League
1.2 Pacific League
1.3 Japan Series

2 Standings

2.1 Central League

2.1.1 Regular Season

2.2 Pacific League

2.2.1 Regular Season
2.2.2 Playoff 1st Stage
2.2.3 Playoff 2nd Stage

3 References

Format[edit]
Central League[edit]

Season Format

Regular Season

Regular Season 1st place is the champion

Pacific League[edit]

Season Format

Regular Season
Playoff 1st Stage: Regular Season 2nd place vs. Regular Season 3rd place – Best of 3
Playoff 2nd Stage: Regular Season 1st place vs. Playoff 1st Stage winner – Best of 5

Playoff 2nd Stage winner is the champion

Japan Series[edit]

Central League champion vs. Pacific League champion – Best of 7

Standings[edit]
Note:Two games for each team are cancelled due to players’ strike
Central League[edit]

Champions: Chunichi Dragons

Regular Season[edit]

Central League
G
W
L
T
Pct.
GB

Chunichi Dragons
138
79
56
3
0.583

Yakult Swallows
138
72
64
2
0.529
7.5

Yomiuri Giants
138
71
64
3
0.525
8.0

Hanshin Tigers
138
66
70
2
0.485
13.0

Hiroshima Carp
138
60
77
1
0.438
20.0

Yokohama BayStars
138
59
76
3
0.438
20.0

Pacific League[edit]

Champions: Seibu Lions

Regular Season[edit]

Pacific League
G
W
L
T
Pct.
GB

Fukuoka Daiei Hawks
133
77
52
4
0.594

Seibu Lions
133
74
58
1
0.560
4.5

Hokkaido Nippon Ham Fighters
133
66
65
2
0.504
12.0

Chiba Lotte Marines
133
65
65
3
0.500
12.5

Kintetsu Buffaloes
133
61
70
2
0.466
17.0

Orix BlueWave
133
49
72
2
0.376
29.0

1652 in science

List of years in science
(table)

… 1642
1643
1644
1645
1646
1647
1648 …

1649
1650
1651
1652
1653
1654
1655

… 1656
1657
1658
1659
1660
1661
1662 …

Art
Archaeology
Architecture
Literature
Music
Philosophy
Science +…

The year 1652 in science and technology involved some significant events.

Contents

1 Publications
2 Births
3 Deaths
4 References

Publications[edit]

Elias Ashmole publishes his anthology of English alchemical literature, Theatrum Chemicum Britannicum.
Gerard Boate’s Natural History of Ireland is published posthumously in London.
Nicholas Culpeper publishes his herbal, The English Physitian, or, An astrologo-physical discourse on the vulgar herbs of this nation, being a compleat method of physick, whereby a man may preserve his body in health, or cure himself, being sick.[1]
Peter Heylin publishes his Cosmographie, one of the earliest attempts to describe the entire world in English and the first known description of Australia.
Priest, statesman, economist and poet Robert Arnauld d’Andilly publishes La manière de cultiver les arbres fruitiers. Par le Sieur Le Gendre, curé d’Hénonville. Où il est traité des pepinieres, des espaliers, des contr’espaliers, des arbres en buisson, & à haute tige in Paris, advocating the training of fruit trees on espaliers.

Births[edit]

April 21 – Michel Rolle, French mathematician, known for Rolle’s theorem (died 1719)
late in year – John Radcliffe, English physician (died 1714)

Deaths[edit]

October 8 – John Greaves, English astronomer (born 1602)
November 4 – Jean-Charles de la Faille, Flemish mathematician (born 1597)
November 21 – Jan Brożek, Polish mathematician, physician and astronomer (born 1585)

References[edit]

^ Curry, Patrick (2004). “Culpeper, Nicholas (1616–1654)”. Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford University Press. Retrieved 2011-03-23.  (subscription or UK public library membership required)

Berlin Motor Show

Berlin Motor Show

Exhibition hall, 1926

Status
Inactive

Genre
Motor show

Venue
Messe Berlin

Location(s)
Berlin

Country
Germany

Inaugurated
1897-1939 (Internationale Automobil-Ausstellung)
1978–2000 (Autos, Avus, Attrkationen)

Most recent
2000 (2002 planned, but cancelled)

Website

www.aaa-berlin.de

The Berlin Motor Show originally started in 1897 in the German capital Berlin as the home of the International Motor Show (Internationale Automobil-Ausstellung, IAA) and ran until 1939. From 1951 the IAA eventually became established in Frankfurt.
A new bi-annual Motor Show, called Autos, Avus, Attraktionen (AAA), was established by the Messe Berlin company in 1978. The last show was held in 2000, with the 2002 show cancelled four months prior to the expected 2002 exhibition.

Contents

1 History
2 2000
3 1998
4 1996
5 References

History[edit]
On 30 September 1897, the first IAA was held by the Mitteleuropäischer Motorwagenverein (“Central European Motor Vehicle Association”) at the Hotel Bristol on the Unter den Linden boulevard in Berlin. A total of eight Benz Velo, Lutzmann, Kühlstein, and Daimler motor vehicles were on display.[1] A second motor show was held in 1898 at the exhibition grounds near Lehrter Bahnhof; in 1899 more than 100 exhibitors participated in the third motor show .
As the automobile became more known and accepted, the IAA became a fixed event in Germany, with at least one held every year, usually in Berlin. In 1902 the show was held for the first time by the Association of German Automotive Industrialists (Verein Deutscher Motorfahrzeug-Industrieller) at Berlin Friedrichstraße station. The 7th exhibition in 1905 was inaugurated by Emperor Wilhelm II and until 1907, there were even two shows per year, as production had increased to an industrial level. In the next years, however, the show was suspended, due to the outbreak of World War I.

Maybach stand, 1924

With a pause after the war, the IAA was then reinstated and returned to a newly built exhibition hall in Berlin Westend in 1921, with 67 German automobile maufacturers displaying 90 vehicles under the motto “comfort”, including the Rumpler Tropfenwagen and a Bosch electric car horn. More than 600 exhibitors participated in the 15th IAA in 1923 and the next year’s show saw the premiere of economy cars like the Hanomag 2/10 PS or the Opel 4 PS (Laubfrosch). The 1927 IAA was held at Cologne (under pressure from Mayor Konrad Adenauer), followed by

Sciusceddu

Sciusceddu is a soup in Italian cuisine prepared using meatballs and broken eggs as primary ingredients.[1][2] It is a traditional Easter dish in Italy.[1] Additional ingredients used include broth, caciocavallo and ricotta cheeses, parsley, salt and pepper.[3] It can be prepared in a similar style to egg drop soup.[3]

Contents

1 Etymology
2 See also
3 Notes
4 References

Etymology[edit]
Juscellum is a Latin word from which the Sicilian name of sciusceddu is based upon.[a] Juscellum is a dish in Ancient Roman cuisine, which was included in Apicius,[4] a Roman recipe book that is believed to have been written in the late 4th or early 5th century.
See also[edit]

Food portal
Italy portal

List of Italian soups
List of soups

Notes[edit]

^ “In sciusceddu, a soup with meatballs and broken eggs, we learn that the Sicilian name of this dish has its roots in Latin, juscellum.”[2]

References[edit]

^ a b Coria, G.; Cipolla, G. (2008). Sicily: Culinary Crossroads. Italy’s food culture. Oronzo Editions. p. 37. ISBN 978-88-7021-745-2. Retrieved May 18, 2016.  (subscription required)
^ a b “Italian Americana”. Volumes 26-27. 2008. p. 238. Retrieved 18 May 2016. 
^ a b Lania, Franco (May 10, 2016). “A Pumped-Up Italian Egg Drop Soup”. The Huffington Post. Retrieved May 18, 2016. 
^ Way, A. (1843). Promptorium parvulorum sive clericorum, lexicon Anglo-Latinum princeps, recens. A. Way. Camden soc (in Latin). p. 268. Retrieved May 18, 2016. 

조개넷

Creighton, Pennsylvania

Creighton, Pennsylvania

Unincorporated community

Creighton

Location within the state of Pennsylvania

Coordinates: 40°35′14″N 79°46′42″W / 40.58722°N 79.77833°W / 40.58722; -79.77833Coordinates: 40°35′14″N 79°46′42″W / 40.58722°N 79.77833°W / 40.58722; -79.77833

Country
United States

State
Pennsylvania

County
Allegheny

Township
East Deer

Elevation
863 ft (263 m)

Time zone
Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)

 • Summer (DST)
EDT (UTC-4)

ZIP codes
15030

Area code(s)
724, 878

Creighton is an unincorporated community in East Deer Township, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, United States;[1] it is located in western Pennsylvania within the Pittsburgh Metropolitan Statistical Area, approximately 20 miles (32 km) northeast of Pittsburgh. Creighton is situated along the Allegheny River at Pool 3. The latitude of Creighton is 40.587N, while the longitude is -79.778W. Creighton appears on the New Kensington West U.S. Geological Survey Map. It is in the Eastern Standard time zone with an elevation of 863 feet (263 m) above sea level.[1]
The Pittsburgh Plate Glass Company was founded in Creighton; its first plant was opened along the river in 1883.[2]

Pittsburgh portal

References[edit]

^ a b “Creighton”. Geographic Names Information System. 2009. Retrieved 2009-11-25. 
^ “The History of Glass Manufacturer PPG Industries”. PPG Industries. Retrieved 2009-06-06. 

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Pittsburgh metropolitan area

Counties

Allegheny
Armstrong
Beaver
Brooke
Butler
Fayette
Hancock
Indiana
Jefferson
Lawrence
Washington
Westmoreland

Map of the Pittsburgh Tri-State with green counties in the metropolitan area and yellow counties in the combined area.

Major cities

Pittsburgh

Cities and towns
15k-50k
(in 2010)

Baldwin
Bethel Park
Butler
Cranberry
Hampton
Hempfield
McCandless
McKeesport
Monroeville
Moon
Mt. Lebanon
Murrysville
New Castle
North Huntingdon
Penn
Penn Hills
Peters
Plum
Ross
Scott
Shaler
Steubenville
Upper St. Clair
Unity
Weirton
West Mifflin
White
Wilkinsburg

Airports

Pittsburgh International
Arnold Palmer
Allegheny County
Beaver
Butler
Eddie Dew
Greensburg Jeannette
Herron
Jefferson
Jimmy Stewart
Joe Hardy
Lakehill
Monroeville
New Castle
Rock
Rostraver
Washington
Wheeling
Zelienople

Topics

Chronology
Education
Economy
Etymology
Government
City Landmarks
Area Landmarks
History
Media
Neighborhoods
Peop

ADTA

Adta or ADTA may refer to:

Adta, an Enochian angel
The Abu Dhabi Tourism Authority

This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title ADTA.
If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended article.

연예인야동

Margareta Huitfeldt

Margareta Huitfeldt (5 November 1608 – 16 November 1683) was a Norwegian-Swedish noble, estate owner and donor.
Life[edit]
The only child of the Danish noble Hartvig Andersen Huitfeldt till Skjelbred och Rommegaard (d. 1637), who lived in Norway, and the Norwegian noble Bente Jonsdotter Schack (d. 1622). Married to Danish noble Tomas Iverssön Dyre till Hvidstedgaard (1605–1651) in 1635. She had three children, who all died very young.
Margareta became one of the greatest land owners in Scandinavia as the heir of her parents and her spouse. She resided in Bohuslän, were most of her properties were situated. Bohuslän belonged to Norway (and thereby Denmark), but became Swedish in 1658. She was a local power holder, with good and influential connections to the authorities. She wished for better conditions for the peasants.
Margareta Huitfeldt is frequently portrayed in the local legends of Bohuslän. During the famous witch trials of 1668–76, the fact that she disliked one of the alleged witches, Helga i Pilanna, who was one of the most well known victims of the Swedish witch hunt, is considered to have led to the condemnation and execution of Helga (1672).
In 1664, she made a famous donation; paid schooling for 30 students a year in Gothenburg, scholarships and support to science. Her will and donation was put under the protection of the crown. It was named “Kungl. och Hvitfeldtskastipendieinrättningen” (1694). This donation has been known as Hvitfeldtska gymnasiet.
References[edit]

Göteborgs donatorer – från äldre tid intill våra dagar, första delen, Hugo Fröding 1911
Bohusläns historia, prof. Erik Lönnroth 1963 s.214-215
Hvitfeldtska Gymnasiet
Bohusläns Adel, A 318 J A Nordströms arkiv vid Göteborgs Landsarkiv 1938
Margareta Huitfeldt, Beata Losman 1984
Sundsby – hus med historia, Eibert Ernby/Bohusläns museum 1988
Hvar 8 Dag : illustreradt magasin, Sjette årgången, [2 oktober 1904 – 24 September 1905], Förlags AB Hvar 8 dags tryckeri, Göteborg 1905. Avsnitt: “Fru Margrete Huitfeldt”, av riksarkivarie H. J. Huitfeldt-Kaas, s. 222-223
Ruth Larsson – En trollkona skall du icke låta leva.

Authority control

WorldCat Identities
VIAF: 59884240
LCCN: no2007109655
ISNI: 0000 0000 5181 3272
SUDOC: 060783745

1896 in Ireland

1895
1894
1893
1892
1891

1896
in
Ireland

1897
1898
1899
1900
1901

Centuries:

17th
18th
19th
20th
21st

Decades:

1870s
1880s
1890s
1900s
1910s

See also:
1896 in the United Kingdom
Other events of 1896
List of years in Ireland

Events from the year 1896 in Ireland.

Contents

1 Events
2 Arts and literature
3 Sport

3.1 Cricket
3.2 Football
3.3 Tennis

4 Births

4.1 Full date unknown

5 Deaths

5.1 Full date unknown

6 References

Events[edit]

February – The Broighter Gold hoard of prehistoric objects is discovered near Limavady by Tom Nicholl while ploughing.
16 May – The first electric tram runs on the Dublin tramways system.
28 March – Tom Gallaher incorporates the Gallaher tobacco business and opens the world’s largest tobacco factory in Belfast.
James Connolly founds the Irish Republican Socialist Party.
John Dillon assumes the leadership of the anti-Parnellite wing of the Home Rule Party.
An extension is made to Arthur Balfour’s Land Act. 1,500 bankrupt estates are made available for sale to tenants.
Ireland’s first motor vehicle laws are introduced.
Restoration of the Church of Ireland’s Kildare Cathedral is completed.

Arts and literature[edit]

20 April – First cinema show in Ireland, at Dan Lowry’s Star of Erin Variety Theatre in Dublin.[1]
The lyrics of The Mountains of Mourne are written by Percy French with Dr. W. Houston Collision.[2]
Charles Villiers Stanford’s comic opera Shamus O’Brien is first performed.

Sport[edit]
Cricket[edit]

International

February: Tim O’Brien becomes the first Irish captain of the England cricket team in a match won against South Africa at Port Elizabeth[3]

Football[edit]

International

29 February Wales 6 – 1 Ireland (in Wrexham)[4]
7 March Ireland 0 – 2 England (in Belfast)[4]
28 March Ireland 3 – 3 Scotland (in Belfast)[4]

Irish League

Winners: Distillery

Irish Cup

Winners: Distillery 3 – 1 Glentoran

Tennis[edit]

The Championships, Wimbledon

Harold Mahony wins the gentleman’s singles Championship

Olympic Games

John Pius Boland wins gold medals in the men’s singles and doubles at the first modern Summer Olympics in Athens (Greece)

Births[edit]

15 February – Arthur Shields, actor (died 1970).
March – Martin Joseph Sheehan, soldier and Royal Air Service Observer in World War I, killed in action (died 1918).
4 April – Sir Osmond Esmonde, 12th Baronet, diplomat and politician (died 1936).
24 April – F. R. Higgins, poet and th